Why You Need to Solve Business Issues Slowly

Don’t be in a rush to solve all your problems. This is from Mike Paton, our visionary at EOS. Thought it might come in handy for you.
Gene
 
 One night this holiday season, my wife and I were wrapping gifts for our family. When a large pile of brightly colored packages sat beside ea ch of us, we stood back to admire our handiwork. Kate’s packages were beautiful – crisply wrapped, carefully secured with beautiful ribbons that matched the wrapping paper, each package festooned with tidy little bows. My packages were technically covered (mostly) with wrapping paper and tape. But they didn’t really look…finished. (READ MORE)   
Keep Moving!

Gene Moorhead

Davmoor
Direct Line: (334) 717-7042
Website: www.davmoor.com
Helping organizations clarify, simplify and achieve their vision.

When the Best Solution Is the Wrong One

When working with your staff, how’s your question-to-statement ratio? Here’s a good thought from Jim Coyle, a fellow EOS implementer.
Gene

 Let me ask the leaders a couple questions. Do you find yourself clearly stating what needs to be done in your team? When a team member has an issue, do you tell them the best way to fix their issue?

If you are working through a performance concern with a staff member, do you make sure you make the perfect plan to remedy their situation? Sounds like a pretty good description of a nice manager. Unfortunately this “nice” manager isn’t all that effective.  (READ MORE)   

Keep Moving!

Gene Moorhead

Davmoor
Direct Line: (334) 717-7042
Website: www.davmoor.com
Helping organizations clarify, simplify and achieve their vision.

Win Real Commitment from Every Team Member… Every Time

Hi,

Rene Boer, my fellow EOS implementer from Chicago sent me this insight and I thought you would find it interesting as well

Gene

What do people in your organization do when decisions don’t go their way? Do they accept the decision even though they disagree with it? Do they demonstrate through their words and actions that they support the decision and that they’re committed to achieving the objective? When communicating inside or outside the organization, do they give the impression that they are completely on board? Do their actions follow their words?  (READ MORE)   
Keep Moving!

Gene Moorhead

Davmoor
Direct Line: (334) 717-7042
Website: www.davmoor.com
Helping organizations clarify, simplify and achieve their vision.

What If You’re Promoting The Wrong People ?

This is from Mike Peyton our EOS visionary and is particularly relevant for small to midsize companies. Gene

“The Peter Principle” is a term coined by Laurence J. Peter in 1969 to describe the recurring phenomenon of employees being promoted to – and often beyond –their highest level of competence. While hilariously illustrated in the comic strip Dilbert, both versions of the television show The Office, and the movie Office Space –the consequences for a small, entrepreneurial company aren’t funny at all.

The Fallout of Promoting the Wrong People
In fact, they can be disastrous. Problems caused by a handful of ineffective people in a company with 1,000 employees can be overcome –
at the expense of their managers, peers or subordinates. But in a 15 – person
company that’s moving fast and working every one at capacity, even one ineffective team member can be fatal. Even so, it happens all the time. When a company goes from zero to 100 employees in 5 -10 years, it’s almost
impossible for its owners and leaders to be great at getting all the regular work
done AND to be great at “people.” When the company needs more or different people, they don’t have the time, the resources, or the skills and experience to clearly define what they need, hire the right people, and then train and manage them properly. Instead they move fast, hire people they already know, turn ‘em loose, and hope everyone “figures it out.” Thus, the Peter Principle.
End the Peter Principle…For Good!
I’m saying this with certainty because I’ve done it myself. And I’ve seen many friends, clients and colleagues do it, too. If this sounds familiar, EOS® can help. The system offers a simple approach to clearly defining what
a “great person” is in your unique organization. It provides a complete set of practical tools designed to help you find, engage and retain the right people
– and to repel the wrong people.
Here are the tools, at a high level:
1.Define your organization’s Core Values — 3 – 7 words or phrases that describe the common attributes of the very best people in your company. Then use those Core Values to build and maintain the culture you want.
2.Create an Accountability Chart™ to properly structure your company. At a high level and on one page, clearly define the roles and responsibilities of every “seat” in the organization.
3.Use the People Analyzer™ and “GWC “to evaluate your people. These tools help you definitively determine whether or not employees are the “Right People” (those who share your Core Values) in the “Right Seat” (those that are consistently good at their jobs).
4.Use “LMA” (Leadership + Management = Accountability) to help leaders, managers and supervisors lead and manage in a way that drives accountability throughout your company. This creates an environment in which accountable people thrive, while the non – accountable are uncomfortable and
leave.
Taking these four steps and using these practical tools will take time. It may sound simple, but change of this magnitude is rarely easy. But when you’re frustrated by your people – including those promoted beyond their
level of competence – it’s definitely worth it. Don’t just curse Laurence J. Peter under your breath. Consider taking these steps and using EOS Tools to strengthen your People Component, fill all your seats with “Right People in the Right Seats,” and banish the Peter Principle – once and for all.
Keep Moving!
Gene Moorhead
Professional EOS Implementer
Davmoor
Direct Line: (334) 717-7042
Website:www.davmoor.com
Helping organizations clarify, simplify and achieve their vision.

Your Smart Victims Unit Is Ruining Productivity and Culture

Here’s an issue that many of my clients are working through as well. Bobi Siembieda, fellow EOS implementer from Chicago, sent me this...

Last month, a good client came to me with some concerns. He felt that his organization had been making great strides in defining their purpose, vision, and core values. He also felt like the work we had done together had really helped to restructure the organization and improve internal processes so that the organization was positioned appropriately to meet future goals.

But now, he felt the really hard part was kicking in – people issues. One of the key strengths of the EOS system is to help business owners get the right people in the right seats. However, sometimes that means moving or letting good people go, if there is no longer a seat for them.

My client was challenged because he felt like both he and his executives had a blind spot for certain people when it came to making decisions on the
right people for the right seats. He found that they tended to overlook poor performance in certain people if they exhibited the following traits:
  • They are intelligent
  • They work hard
  • But, they act like a victim
These “victims” either always have an excuse for why something didn’t get done or seem to feel sorry for themselves with all of the work they have to do or new projects they have to take on. Their lack of performance and their “victimize” energy bring the rest of the team down, but it’s hard to let these people go because they seem to work hard and they have the intelligence or skill set necessary for the job.
My client encountered so many of these situations that he named this group of employees the “Smart Victims Unit” or the SVU. He wanted to know if this was normal or common in other organizations or if this was a problem unique to him and his team
The answer is, it’s VERY COMMON.
Do You Have a Smart Victim Problem in Your Company?
The hardest people decisions to make are when it seems like an employee is the right person for the right seat because they have the skills necessary, they work hard, and on paper they should be ideal. But they are bringing the team down. It’s so much easier to let someone go or move someone out of a role when there are strong performance issues, a lack of necessary skills, and plenty of documentation to support your decision.
So let’s define what it means to have the “right” people in the “right”
seats.
The right person is one who embodies the company’s core values. They are the living, breathing personification of what the company believes, how it behaves, and the value it wants to deliver. It helps you determine who the right people are for YOUR business. Someone perfect for your business may not be perfect for another one.
The right seat means that the person has a role in the organization that fits them perfectly. They understand what they are expected to do, they want and embrace the role, and they have the expertise and experience to perform to expectations.
As I have explained to many of my business owner clients, employees need to have the skills and experience required to fill a key role, but they also need to fit in with the company culture and be willing to take direction and handle challenges as they come. Social intelligence, the ability to work well with others and navigate tough situations is very important. You can train
people to acquire or hone skills if they have potential, but you can’t change someone’s personality. I often use an analogy of,
“If someone is born with four fingers, you can’t make them grow a fifth.” Do they have the drive and ambition to put in the hard work to be a part of your organization’s growth?
So, how do you overcome the blind spot or eliminate the Smart Victim Unit in your organization?
Take the Emotion Out of It
There are a few tools in the EOS Toolbox that can help take the emotion out of your people decisions –the Accountability Chart, the People Analyzer, GWC, and the 5-5-5.
First, the Accountability Chart™, which helps the leadership team define the structure for the organization needed to support its operation. Each seat defined should have five major roles and responsibilities associated with it to help understand the skills (hard and soft) that are necessary to perform in that seat.
I also use another tool with my clients called the
GWC™, which stands for Get it, Want it, Capacity. At its core, the GWC helps
you through three key questions:
1.Does the person GET it —does he or she understand the role of that seat?
2.Does the person WANT it—does he or she have the passion to do that seat’s work?
3.Does the person have the CAPACITY to do it—does he or she have both the skills and the time for that seat’s responsibilities?
Usually, SVU employees fall apart when you really scrutinize the Get and the Want of the role. By using these structured tools, you’ll have the data necessary to evaluate people without emotion and see where gaps  and issues need to be addressed. Having the Right People in the Right Seats help create a team that is unstoppable!

Keep Moving!

Gene Moorhead

334 -717-7042 direct
g.moorhead@davmoor.com

When your Business Team Members don’t ” Get It”

 

Don Tinney our EOS Integrator sent this to me, and I thought it very worthwhile to pass on to you.
Gene
The best basketball players in the league get it. The original Dream Team’s Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson and Larry Bird come to mind. They understand the game so intuitively, it’s second nature to them. They make playing seem effortless.In my article on building your business dream team, I stated that you must have players who passionately share your vision and have the skills to help your business win consistently. Your players must get it, want it, and have the capacity ( GWC™ in Traction terms) to consistently deliver what their position on the team requires. So what does “get it” really mean?
Not Everyone Gets It
The definition of “get it” from Traction is simple:
“Get It simply means that they truly understand their role, the culture, the systems, the pace and how the job comes together.”
And not everyone on your team gets it. You probably already have a sense of who these players are by the amount of direction and supervision they require.
Let’s break this down further into three things to watch for – three measures for getting it:
Understanding the Why
People who get it understand fully that what they do matters to the team. They get how their work fits into and complements the whole: the culture, core focus and processes, and achieving the big company goal. Compare it to when a basketball player passes the ball well, sets picks, draws defense away from teammates, etc. He or she understands the Why behind what they do without a lot of explanation.
Mastery of Their Position
They understand how to do their work well and produce the desired outcome consistently. This team member demonstrates efficiency and mastery to a level that would be considered craftsmanship. They also know what
to measure to assure that mastery and rely on those measurables to maximize their performance. It’s like the player who understands that getting too many fouls early in a game will jeopardize his overall performance and winning the game.
Problem Solver
When issues arise in their functional part of the business, they know how to resolve them. If they don’t already know the answer, they know what to do to find the answer. Someone who doesn’t understand how to solve their problems will continually get stuck and be waiting for someone to give them direction — dramatically slowing progress.
Leaders Who Don’t Get It
Someone who truly gets it will often be good at seeing opportunities for improving their functional part of the business. That’s a particularly important point for players in leadership seats. Pay attention to leaders who are
silent when the team is solving issues in a meeting. They might not be able to
see or uncover the root causes of issues and propose viable ways to resolve them. They rarely or never offer ideas, suggestions, or solutions
during discussion, which is usually a clear sign they don’t get it.
An all too common example is that of the sales leader who comes back quarter after quarter with poor numbers but no solutions to improve them. Keep in mind there is nothing wrong with not having the answer in the moment. But they must have the desire and know-how to find a solution.
Keep Moving!
Gene Moorhead
Professional EOS Implementer
DAVMOOR
Direct Line: (334) 717-7042
Helping organizations clarify, simplify and achieve their vision.

Why Great Bosses Don’t Tell You What To Do

Rene Boer fellow EOS Implementer and co-author of the just released book “How to be a Great  Boss” just sent me this and I thought you might this to be helpful.

Gene

If you’re like most bosses, you do most of the talking. Frankly, this one-way-street behavior needs to change. Your job is to ensure that the dialogue is 80/20, where your direct report is doing 80% of the talking and you’re talking only 20% of the time. The only way to make that happen is to ask questions instead of making statements.

The Value of Asking Questions

Ask “why, who, what, where, and when” questions. The typical boss, when presented with a problem, makes statements such as, “You should have done this …” or “Don’t do that…” You’ll be amazed what happens when an issue is brought to you, and instead of making a “you should have” statement, you ask the person a question along the lines of: “Knowing what you know now, what would you do differently next time?” Or, “What would you do?” (READ MORE)

Keep Moving!

Gene Moorhead

Davmoor
Direct Line: (334) 717-7042
Website: www.davmoor.com
Helping organizations clarify, simplify and achieve their vision.

Four Ways the “Blame Game” Can Kill Your Business

Mike Paton, our EOS Visionary sent this to me and I’ll bet we have all been there with the frustrations! Here’s a good solution.

Gene

When we begin implementing EOS with a company, we always ask the leaders to commit fully to the journey ahead – the journey to become their very best as a leadership team. One of the specific things that requires is to take responsibility for everything that you and your fellow leaders have created in your organization. Like a lot of things in EOS, that sounds easy – but it’s hard and very rare.
What we’re talking about is avoiding the blame game, which is so common in lean, fast-moving organizations. Most readers of this blog know the feeling well – you’re sailing along, growing and prospering, and then all of a sudden you hit the ceiling. You’re stuck or derailed by a major problem, or by hundreds of little ones. It’s frustrating and scary – and when you’re frustrated and scared your emotions can get the better of you. (READ MORE)

Keep Moving!

Gene Moorhead

Davmoor
Direct Line: (334) 717-7042
Website: www.davmoor.com
Helping organizations clarify, simplify and achieve their vision.

Is Your Organization Led by Great Bosses?

One of my favorite fellow EOS implementers is Rene Boer from Chicago. He just sent me this- thought you might find it helpful.

Consider this for a minute – no matter what title is on your business card, be it foreman, supervisor, manager, president or chief executive officer – the people who report to you call you their boss.

The word “boss” comes from the Dutch word “baas,” originally a term of respect used to address a person in charge. When you consider the original meaning, being called a boss feels pretty good doesn’t it? Accept the title “boss” with pride. You’re in charge. Be in charge. Take pride in the responsibility but don’t become arrogant or take the title “boss” for granted. (READ MORE)

Keep Moving!

Gene Moorhead

Davmoor
Direct Line: (334) 717-7042
Website: www.davmoor.com
Helping organizations clarify, simplify and achieve their vision.
DAVMOOR, dba Moorhead Marketing LLC, 8650 Minnie Brown Rd, Suite 126, Montgomery, AL 36117

A Cancer That Can Kill Your Business

Don Tinney our EOS Integrator sent me this – I thought it was excellent as usual and might be helpful for you.

Gene

There are interesting parallels between cancer in a human body and cancer in an organization and it all has to do with what’s going on at our core. Just as corrupting cancer cells attack the healthy cells and core functions of the body, something just as cancerous attacks healthy team members and the core of our business.

Serious damage will occur if we don’t detect and treat the cancer early. (READ MORE)